The Greatest Stories Ever Told – Part 2

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Five of the Greatest Stories Ever Told to Man, by Man (cont'd)

The Greatest Stories Ever Told is back with two very special additions which have, not by chance, been saved for last. A poet once said; “writers are mediums, hoping that good spirits and not evil ones, choose us for their instruments.” Consequently, there are stories which I believe are not told by those writing them but by, for lack of a better word, let's call it a higher power.

Below are two of such books.

          The Green Mile - Stephen King

Stephen King appears twice on this list for good reason. One of the wildest minds of our time delves deep into the storehouse of his imaginative wonder and produces a chilling piece. I could go a long way in  describing this book and the story it holds, but still not come close to scratching the surface.

All I can say is this; if you read nothing else on this list so far, please read The Green Mile. I daresay I have read my fair share of books in my time. In all that time, no story has moved me more than that of John Coffey, as narrated by Paul Edgecombe. I am not ashamed to say I cried a considerable deal while reading this book, a feat only shared by Chimamanda Adichie’s; Purple Hibiscus (which narrowly misses out on this list).

A story of magic in unexpected places, love at close quarters, and evil in pious ignorance. The Green Mile challenges the human mind to believe, to imagine. Click To Tweet

A story of magic in unexpected places, love at close quarters, and evil in pious ignorance. Stephen King once again challenges the human mind to believe, to imagine.

Enough said, go read the book!

          In the Courts of the Sun - Brian D’ Amato

While reading this book, I kept turning back to the jacket to stare at the picture of the author. I would stare at it for minutes while thinking to myself, “how did you write this?” Even just reading the book, the sheer magnitude of the story was so staggering, I could only imagine what it must have taken to write it.

I can assure you of one thing with In the Courts of the Sun; you will never read a more detailed story. Click To Tweet

This is another story that I think speaks for itself. I can only encourage you to follow Jed DeLanda’s quest to travel back in time to acquire the knowledge which might just save the world. After all, it’s December 21st, 2012, which, according to the Mayan calendar, is the day the world ends. An unsuspecting descendant of the Maya himself, Jed, must travel back to 664 AD to learn about a “sacrifice game” which signifies man’s only hope for survival.

Once again, one cannot help but feel the intervention of some “higher presence” in the creation of this story. I can assure you of one thing with In the Courts of the Sun; you will never read a more detailed story.

P.S. Two books narrowly missed out appearing on this list; “Purple Hibiscus” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and “Dolores Claiborne” by Stephen King.

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