Self-Awareness: A Guide on How to Train Your Demons

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We live in a society where almost everyone lays claim to self-awareness which, and quite unfortunately so, is merely a case of “speaking of those things that be not, as though they were”. Self-denial is, more often than not, mistaken for self-awareness.

Sometimes, just admitting to having a problem can be the most difficult thing in the world to do. It is ridiculously easy to get carried away with speaking good things about one’s self, (absolutely nothing wrong with positive thinking by the way) while repressing all indications of one’s shortcomings. Knowing your flaws and being able to accept them for what they are, and that they are as much a part of you as your strengths, is a vital ingredient for any kind of personal progress.

It has been said that growing up is the rise of the conscious mind, the widening of your perspective of the world around you. Despite this, can’t it also be said that growing up is the reduction of input; the rise of the ability to filter the information you receive from the world and decide what you believe or don’t believe? So even though we see the ageing process as a rise of self-awareness, it can also be a double-edged sword. What you believe becomes very much dependent on your filtering process.

Consequently, when we observe the way the world reacts to people with the same issues we have, we tend to retreat back into our shells. Rather than face these flaws, we filter our beliefs and convince ourselves that by sheer force we can will these setbacks away.

No amount of wishful thinking can erase one’s problems, and ignoring a flaw doesn’t make it suddenly disappear. Click To Tweet

The truth is that no amount of wishful thinking can erase one’s problems, and ignoring a flaw doesn’t make it suddenly disappear. The only way to triumph is to study them and find ways to improve, much the same way you would do with your strengths.

However, it is important to understand that while flaws are part and parcel of human existence, they shouldn’t form the basis of who you are. Click To Tweet

However, it is important to understand that while flaws are part and parcel of human existence, they shouldn’t form the basis of who you are. In the words of Andrew John “Hozier” Byrne; “don’t you ever tame your demon, always keep him on a leash”. The human condition can be described in itself, as a flawed concept. It is up to you to open your eyes to the reality of your existence and understand the difference between what you are and what you could be.

We also take a lot of liberties when it comes to accepting responsibility for our issues. The possibilities are endless; one could blame parents, even family lineage, and there is the all-time favorite, Providence. Blame, I always say, is like air; it goes everywhere and doesn’t solve any problem it didn’t itself start. Life, for all its misery, is ours. It belongs to no other.

Two ways or another, we are all flawed beings, striving for a bit of perfection. Isn’t that what keeps us ticking? Knowing that if you could only apply yourself the right amount, you could be that much better. The cardinal rule of life, at least in this writer’s opinion, is to know yourself, strengths, weaknesses and all.

Only by doing so can you hope to match any of the glory of the divine.

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